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Umeå, Sweden, 28 October 2020: Intinor, Sweden’s leading developer of products and solutions for high-quality video over the public internet, has launched a new generation of its RACK+ product series. For the first time, as many as 12 independent video feeds can be combined in a single device, to be delivered synchronously across multiple internet paths.

Intinor is widely recognised as a market leader in the delivery of high quality video over the public internet, using broadband (ethernet), cellular (3G, 4G LTE or 5G) and Ka-band satellite as required to achieve the necessary bandwidth and resilience. To achieve the quality and security goals, Intinor has developed its own transport protocol, Bifrost Reliable Transport, BRT™.

The solution is used worldwide, not least in esports content. With the constant demands for more cameras and feeds, along with higher image quality, Intinor has further developed its popular Direkt link 400 RACK+ to handle 12 inputs, which can be a mixture of SDI and NDI, and at resolutions up to 4k at 60p. The software encoders are hosted by dedicated hardware in a 2U appliance.

As well as the video feeds and associated audio, the Direkt series also supports a VPN for remote control of PTZ or for tally. The output can be streamed over a single internet connection or fed to the Intinor Heimdall which incorporates multiple cellular modems for bonded delivery and additional resilience.

With up to 30 IP or Netvideo inputs, 12x SDI/NDI in or out and multiple software encoders, this unit really lets you create your own workflow.

“We took the G30 out of the box, put it on our mount and turned it on,” said Charles Cole, technical operations manager at TRP. “The stabilization of our picture is significantly better than anything we had seen before – the results have been very, very good.”

“Our customers love that we make remote production simple, practical and powerful,” said Roland Axelsson, CEO and Founder at Intinor. “With up to 30 IP or Netvideo inputs, 12 SDI or NDI in or out and multiple software encoders, we now give them all the power they need. All this with the low latency and high quality for which we are known – our Swedish Army Knife of remote video connectivity just got even better!”

The new generation Direkt RACK+ and Direkt router are now available.

 

G30 provides universal support with very high-performance stabilization and movement

London, UK, 15 October 2020: Mo-Sys, world leader in precision camera tracking solutions for virtual studios and augmented reality, today launched a new generation of gyro-stabilized remote head, the G30. Its radical new design, with a compact, 45-degree frame, allows it to support virtually any broadcast or digital cinematography camera rig for precise movement and stabilization.

“In our conversations with the production community, we know that there is a real need for excellent stabilization and precision camera positioning without the expense and limitations of device-specific and proprietary mounts,” said Michael Geissler, CEO of Mo-Sys. “Whether it is on a vehicle, a remote mount or a crane, producers and directors want to be unrestricted creatively, with a device that is quick to set up and balance, and will accept whatever camera and accessories they need.”

The G30’s 45˚ frame geometry provides easy access to all the camera connections and accessories, making it simple to install any type of camera quickly and securely. The short, stiff frame provides rigidity for rigs of up to 30kg, and high torque direct drive motors deliver crisp, precise camera movement alongside excellent stabilization. Open hubs for the three drive motors means cable routing is clear and tidy and avoids the need for sliprings and camera-specific cables.

The unique frame design eliminates a serious limitation with some existing gyro head designs: the issue of gimbal lock, where pan axis movement – including stabilization – are impossible when the camera is pointing directly down. The G30 has impressive pan and tilt movement ranges, along with ±45˚ roll, suitable for most creative productions. Axis encoders are built into each motor assembly for direct input into virtual production systems.

Launch customer for the G30 is Thoroughbred Racing Productions, based in Melbourne, Australia. It provides comprehensive coverage of more than 525 race meetings a year, including a camera car tracking each race. That car has used an earlier Mo-Sys stabilization gimbal, and TRP has now used the G30 for several months.

“We took the G30 out of the box, put it on our mount and turned it on,” said Charles Cole, technical operations manager at TRP. “The stabilization of our picture is significantly better than anything we had seen before – the results have been very, very good.”

Cole pointed to the excellent stabilization of shots from a fast-moving car, including the effective reduction of low frequency disturbances due to potholes on the course-side track. He also praised the simplicity of set-up, particularly as different courses require different zoom settings and therefore different rates of panning to track the action smoothly.

The controlling software of the G30 includes the ability to fine-tune the balance of the camera quickly and largely automatically, significantly reducing the set-up time. The rigid frame design and semi-automated balance system ensures that any camera rig up to 30kg can be installed without counterweights and be ready for use very quickly. Users can store pre-sets for frequently used camera combinations to speed set-up even more.

 

Aldermaston, UK, 29 September 2020 - GB Labs, innovators of powerful and intelligent storage solutions for the media and entertainment industries, has launched Unify Hub, a platform designed to meet all the challenges of today’s media production environment combining on premise and cloud content, empowering remote production while maintaining data integrity and security.

Unify Hub is a data management platform designed for today’s changed world. It manages storage – on site or in the cloud; from GB Labs or from other vendors – to provide a working environment which is simple and fast, providing the tools for maximum productivity from production and post production artists.

“For most of this year, collaborative production has been impacted,” said Dominic Harland, CEO and CTO at GB Labs. “Content is back to being stored in multiple locations, with all the problems of delays in moving material from place to place, the risk of creating multiple ‘master’ versions, and of course poor security.

“First and foremost, Unify Hub provides a unified approach to content and metadata,” Harland added. “Wherever your material is physically stored, the content you need appears as a single, secure and coherent source. That makes it ideal for high-efficiency collaborative and remote working.”

Unify Hub offers five key pillars of advances in productivity, connectivity and security:

Unify Hub Cloud Mounts: Align the local user permissions with cloud accounts to facilitate single sign-in and simplify the secure access of cloud accounts on-premise

Acceleration: Leverage GB Labs technology to speed up the user experience, as well as reducing costs and saving internet bandwidth
S3 Endpoint: Connect on-premise workspaces to cloud services or remote users

Remote Working: Provide remote workers with a seamless experience, regardless of your location

Virtual Workspaces: Simply select what is needed and securely make available everywhere, instantly

Through its management structure, Unify Hub allows users and groups to be established for each project. All appropriate cloud accounts can then be accessed through the single sign-on, with pre-authenticated cloud endpoints appearing as SMB storage shares. For system administrators Unify Hub File Manager provides a single pane of glass overview and control; for users their log-in brings all the material they need to their workstation, wherever they are working and the content is stored.

Unify Hub is the winner of the Best of Show Award 2020 during IBC 2020 from TVBEurope magazine.

Aldermaston, UK, 29 Sept - 1 Oct 2020 - GB Labs, innovators of powerful and intelligent storage solutions for the media and entertainment industries, is proud to be part of the inaugural BroadcastAsia (29 September – 1 October) immersive virtual convention. As well as a fully staffed booth, GB Labs is making two presentations on key products: CloakDR and the award-winning Unify Hub, which will be launched at the event.

Unify Hub was designed for today’s changed world, a storage appliance which has support for remote production and distanced implementation baked in. Unify Hub is a powerful control layer, tuned to the challenging needs of broadcast, which manages storage – from GB Labs or other vendors – whether that storage is on premises or in the cloud; local or remote. So it can leverage existing storage as well as providing a sure foundation for future plans.

“The pandemic has forced changes on the way we work, bringing remote collaborative working to the fore,” said Ben Pearce, CBO Asia and Co-Founder at GB Labs. “The temptation is to go back to the bad old days of material stored in multiple locations, with all the problems of delays in moving material from place to place, the risk of creating multiple ‘master’ versions, and of course poor security.

“As the name suggests, Unify Hub provides a simple, unified approach to content and metadata, so that wherever it is physically stored, it appears as a single, secure and coherent source, ideal for high-efficiency collaborative and remote working,” Pearce explained.” Unify Hub is a winner of the Best of Show Award 2020 during IBC 2020 from TVBEurope magazine.

The other featured product at BroadcastAsia is CloakDR, a revolutionary approach to 'no single point of failure' content security from GB Labs. The intelligence in GB Labs servers uses CloakDR software to build redundant storage systems which are always synchronised from the moment of ingest. This allows CloakDR to dynamically allocate one appliance as primary, one as secondary, and to provide instant failover whatever the incident.

The inherent intelligence maintains a single IP address for storage, so the rest of the infrastructure can continue unaware of any issues. The result is perfect resilience: content is read from and written to the servers without interruption.

“We are excited to be involved in this year’s BroadcastAsia,” added Pearce “The organisers of the parent event, ConnecTechAsia, have gone to extraordinary lengths to create a virtual experience that is as real as possible, with staff on booths ready to answer questions and presentations on key new technologies. The technology they have brought together to make this a satisfying and engaging experience for ‘visitors’ looks excellent, and we are looking forward to taking part.”

Aldermaston, UK, 21 September 2020 - GB Labs, the leader in intelligent storage solutions, has provided its FastNAS storage system to Fancy Film, Los Angeles, enabling the facility to complete colour correction and other finishing services on a major new documentary TV series.

Tony Shek, Fancy Film CTO, said, “We were rapidly getting into 4K finishing and HDR Dolby Vision, which meant that we had to start looking for shared storage that was fast enough to run in real-time but was also cost effective. We researched a lot of companies, but in terms of cost effectiveness, the quotes we received were anything but.”

Fancy Film Online Editor Jacob Fisher added, “When high volumes of ultra-high resolution content starts pouring in, you need the ability to work on that content from multiple workstations at speed, which at the time was a capability we didn’t have.”

Rave reviews during NAB 2019 from existing GB Labs storage users convinced Shek that he may have located a solution. A subsequent referral from a user to GB Labs’ West Coast representative and installer, New Media Hollywood, meant that Fancy Film had found what it needed in FastNAS.

FastNAS shared storage combines the benefits of hard disk and solid state drives in a single device and has become the high performance storage system of choice worldwide, all at a highly affordable price point.

Shek said, “We took on a high-profile job, and even though we knew ahead of time that the majority of the footage was going to arrive in ultra-high resolution, it was a relief to discover soon into our trial with FastNAS - during which we pushed it to its limits for a solid week - that we didn’t have to worry. It just worked. The FastNAS system didn’t even break a sweat. All we had to do then was focus on the creative, and the results are marvellous.”

Adi Antariksa, GB Labs Chief Business Officer for the Americas said, “It’s deeply gratifying to have our storage systems deliver on what they promise, and then some, especially when it comes to household brand projects like this. We look forward to continuing to support Fancy Film in current and future projects as we get almost as much satisfaction from their success as they do.”

London, UK, 22 September 2020: Mo-Sys, a world leader in precision camera tracking solutions for virtual studios and augmented reality, will be showcasing its award-winning StarTracker Studio at BroadcastAsia 2020’s all-new virtual reality experience running from September 29 to October 1 2020.

Having recently won a Virtual Best of Show Award during IBC 2020, Mo-Sys StarTracker Studio, the world’s first pre-configured virtual production system, brings moving camera virtual production within reach of all market sectors.

StarTracker from Mo-Sys is proven as the most precise and reliable camera tracking technology, using dots on the studio ceiling (“stars”) which are placed at random and tracked to plot camera positions with extraordinary accuracy.

StarTracker Studio combines StarTracker camera tracking with a powerful all-in-one virtual production system capable of working with green screen studios or LED volumes. The system uses Mo-Sys VP Pro software to connect camera tracking data from up to 16 cameras to the Unreal Engine graphics. StarTracker Studio uses a smart system design to reduce the typical hardware required for multi-camera virtual production, and the whole system comes pre-configured in a flight-cased rack.

“We’re looking forward to demonstrating the performance, flexibility and simplicity StarTracker Studio offers to companies who need to create virtual studio and augmented reality content,” said Michael Geissler, CEO of Mo-Sys. 

Mo-Sys will also be detailing how its VP Pro and StarTracker technologies operate with LED volumes for virtual productions that want to use on-set finishing techniques.

“LED-wall technology now offers a viable alternative to the traditional green screen / post-production workflow for visual effects (VFX) shooting. Specifically, LED walls enable a composited shot to be captured on-set, rather than just previewed on-set, thereby removing the need for downstream post-production,” Geissler continued. “LED walls won’t replace green screen, both will co-exist going forwards as each is suited to a different type of VFX shot. The benefit of StarTracker Studio is that it handles both workflows”.

To register for the BCA Virtual Event and visit Mo-Sys’s virtual booth, please visit: https://l.feathr.co/bca-exhibitor-landing-page--mo-sys-engineering

UK Pavilion, ConnecTechAsia 22 September 2020: The UK Pavilion at ConnecTechAsia has provided a valuable showcase for broadcast, telecom and IT technology companies from Great Britain and Northern Ireland in recent years. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this year's exhibition will be a virtual event but is still set to be a valuable platform for the latest and best in high-tech equipment and systems from the United Kingdom.

Organised by Tradefair on behalf of techUK, which promotes the British digital technology sector, the UK Pavilion for 2020 will give participating firms a presence across the three specialist shows that come under the umbrella of ConnecTechAsia. The super-technology expo, usually held in Singapore, comprises BroadcastAsia (broadcasting, pro audio, film and digital media), CommunicAsia (information and communication technology) and SatelliteAsia (satellite communication technology). These will run in parallel with TechXLR8Asia, which covers enterprise technology and integration.

The shows will focus on the new and emerging technologies that are providing the basis for the interconnected media, consumer and business markets of the future. These include 5G, AI and ML (artificial intelligence and machine learning), the Internet of Things (IoT), OTT, satellite, the cloud, data analytics, virtual and artificial realities (VR/AR), cyber security and blockchain.

The three-day, virtualised version of ConnecTechAsia will feature more than 180 virtual exhibitor booths that will recreate as closely as possible the experience of visiting companies at a real-world show. There is also a full online conference programme of stimulating presentations, with 220 live keynotes plus Q&A and breakout sessions. As at previous ConnecTechAsia shows, there will be networking and VIP lounges, invitation-only roundtables and opportunities to meet the speakers.

ConnecTechAsia 2020 takes place from 29th September to 1st October.

UK Pavilion companies come under one or several of the technology sub-groups that are exhibiting at ConnecTechAsia.

A2P (Application to Person) Business Messaging
TMT Analysis
 
Acquisition/Production (including 4K/UHD, cameras, drones, lighting, motion capture, VR)
Exterity, Hitomi, Mo-Sys
 
Artificial Intelligence
Air for Life
 
Business Intelligence/Business Support Systems (BSS)
Emeldi Group
 
Captioning and subtitling
Broadstream
 
Content Distribution and Delivery
Exterity, GB Labs, Hitomi, Open Broadcast, Varnish Software
 
Content Management and Systems
Broadstream, Exterity, GB Labs, TSL Products
 
Content Security
Exterity, GB Labs
 
CRM Systems
Emeldi Group
 
Digital Signage
Emeldi Group
 
E-commerce and marketplaces
Emeldi Group
 
Esports
Hitomi
 
Integrated Playout Systems
Broadstream
 
High-throughput Satellite (HTS)
Vialite Communications
 
Lip Sync Solutions
Hitomi
 
Mobile Identity
TMT Analysis
 
Mobile Numbering Data and Intelligence
TMT Analysis
 
Mobile Satellite
Vialite Communications
 
TMT Analysis
Varnish Software
 
Post-Production
GB Labs
 
Professional Audio/Radio
Hitomi, TSL Products
 
RF Microwave
Vialite Communications
 
Satellite Broadband Communications and Operators
Vialite Communications
 
Smart Living
Air for Life

Cambridge, UK, 15 September 2020: Pixel Power, the global leader in playout, automation and graphics, has added StreamMaster PRIME to its range of graphics and playout products. Leveraging its renowned StreamMaster Media Processing technology platform, StreamMaster PRIME is a turnkey appliance with a flexible function set, designed primarily as a replacement for individual devices in a traditional architecture.

“Many of the broadcasters we talk to have told us that they are not yet in a position to move to an all new, software-defined playout architecture, but that individual items in their legacy systems need replacing,” explained James Gilbert, CEO of Pixel Power. “StreamMaster PRIME gives them a single, cost-effective appliance, connecting over SDI, with all the usual automation interfaces, so it is a simple plug-in replacement for a life-expired master control switcher, video server or graphics inserter.

“Most importantly, the software licences for StreamMaster PRIME are transferable, so when the broadcaster begins to migrate towards a new architecture or deployment model, the existing functionality can be transferred at no additional cost,” he added.

StreamMaster PRIME is a dedicated appliance, capable of supporting automated branding graphics, multi-layer static and animated logos, clocks, text crawls, tickers, DVE moves and more. Options include dual port video server, audio processing for multi-channel sound and master control functionality.

It is capable of autonomous operation, with hardware or software UI control panels also available. It is plug-and-play with all major automation systems.

“This is a direct response to a real need from the industry,” said Gilbert. “It’s a standard appliance with sufficient hardware power to run the software applications likely to be needed, tailored to the user’s requirements. For those who need to keep a legacy broadcast chain running, or perhaps an outside broadcast truck needing motion graphics playback, it is a very welcome solution.”

StreamMaster PRIME is available now.

By Jenny Priestley | TVBEurope | Published 7 September 2020

TVBEurope asks four members of the media tech industry including  Manor Marketing clients Pixel Power and Tradefair for their thoughts on a lack of trade shows, what aspects they'll miss, and what changes they'd like to see implemented.

Who would have thought at the start of 2020 the media tech industry would lose both NAB and IBC, its two biggest trade shows?

How far into 2021 the new virtual world of trade shows will spread remains to be seen. But for the moment, how does the media tech industry connect and showcase its innovations without a physical show? TVBEurope asked four industry experts for their views on a year without trade shows.

What does a lack of trade shows in 2020 mean for you and your business?

Stuart Russell, senior communications manager, Ross Video: The lack of physical events has been frustrating insofar as everyone at Ross enjoys getting face-time with customers and partners, and we always have cool new solutions to talk about, so it’s been a very strange few months indeed. That said, however, there’s no doubt that the number of people that we speak to at trade shows and events represents only a tiny fraction of our possible customer-base, and online activities give us an opportunity to speak to people who might not ordinarily make trips to the big ‘halo’ events such as NAB Show and IBC.

Ciaran Doran, EVP, Pixel Power: While there have been real drawbacks to the lack of tradeshows there are real benefits to online video meetings – the customer gets to bring more people than could have made it to Amsterdam or Las Vegas and we get to give them more time with more key staff involved in the presentation and demonstrations. Since all our solutions are software defined and virtualisable we can demonstrate anything from anywhere, to anyone.

Mark Birchall, managing director, Tradefair: The past six months have been an interesting, largely unprecedented and, let’s be frank, a painful experience for everyone. But, on a more basic note for these purposes, moving abruptly from a physical trade show to a virtual facsimile required many of us to restart from scratch and recalibrate everything we know and apply it to a “new now”, which is no small undertaking.

In my view, the relative success of a virtual event depends on what is delivered over that virtual platform(s). For me, a virtual event that has live interaction via chat and video – and includes live presentations and a degree of business matching – can work. But it will work better if conducted in real time rather than as a virtual content basket to be plucked from when convenient. There’s a place for the latter, of course, but for engagement you can’t replace “live”, virtual or otherwise.

It’s a given that the aim of trade show participation in every case is to do everything possible to increase the odds that the event will work for you. And that requires time, expertise, and most of all, engagement. If you’re not all in, you can’t expect to get everything you want out of it.

Bob Charlton, Scribe PR: Most definitely a saving in shoe leather and more time spent at home with the family, both of which are good. But seriously, I’m a big fan of the major tradeshows. At these events, my clients get face time with their most important customers, which is invaluable. Without these opportunities, my business has seen a boom – never before has targeted, proactive media relations been valued so highly by my clients.

Let me explain. Normally, at the tradeshows, my clients stage live demonstrations of their latest product developments, as well as special closed-door briefings of what is coming along soon. Without this option, they need to get those messages across using other means, and the trade publications are invaluable in this regard.

What aspects of trade shows will you miss?

SR: Definitely the human interaction. I get a big kick out of talking to customers and the press at shows about the new product launches; doing this online is obviously better than not doing it at all, but it does feel a little unreal and it’s not quite as satisfying. I also miss spending time with my colleagues – Ross is now almost 900 employees worldwide and the bigger shows are a fantastic opportunity to spend time with colleagues that I wouldn’t normally see. We’re fortunate enough to have great camaraderie at Ross and we all enjoy getting together and spending time at shows.

MB: Trade shows are very much a part of our lives. We very much miss the planning, preparation, and delivery of the UK Pavilions. It’s not just our livelihood. We all experience the phenomenon that, when we’re at shows, they become our alternate world. It’s “show time” life. Just like Tradefair, our clients see their existing client base; work closely with new companies, clients, and individuals, and spend considerable time learning, networking, and planning for the next cycle.

Additionally, it’s vital to use that time to gain an even better understanding of what’s happening in the marketplace and how clients are positioning themselves within that market. Broadly speaking, we generally see and regularly adopt the good things that people are doing, and we’re in a position to give advice to those who may be struggling with either their direction or with practical or logistical considerations. We can parlay our experience with companies that have been successful in their approach and share it with those could benefit from those ideas. I miss helping to make those decisions in person and share in the enjoyment of our clients’ successes as a result. That’s the best part of our job. It’s too early to tell if a similar sense of achievement can be had over an internet connection, but we’re all still learning.

BC: The tradeshows provide fantastic networking opportunities with key editors, journalists and industry analysts. Social distancing has changed into isolation and it feels like a long time since we were all together.

If you have news worth telling, then organise a press event to communicate this. I really miss the thrill I get from arranging these events – whether it’s a press conference or a smaller roundtable press and analyst briefing during the show.

Also, specifically with IBC, I will miss the opportunity to see the new exhibitors and what they bring. The tented pavilion at the front of the RAI (Hall 14 I think) is an Aladdin’s Cave of new and fascinating products and services – very often with exhibitors on tiny stands with shoe-string budgets. Visiting these stands is definitely something that I will miss this year.

How likely are you to return to physical trade shows in 2021, or do you think virtual is the way forward?

SR: I think physical events are unlikely to take place until the middle of 2021 at the earliest, so everything will be virtual until then. When shows do come back, I think footprint and footfall with naturally be lower – I know both NAB and IBC are expecting to run smaller events in 2021 and I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. The larger shows have perhaps become a little bloated over the years, and the idea of smaller, more tightly focused events is more appealing to me. A hybrid model comprising physical events with virtual elements in complement looks to be the way forward beyond 2021 – that will allow us to reach a large international audience online and still share our stories with the people traveling to visit the physical events.

CD: The first real tradeshow in our industry will be special and we definitely want to be part of it. Virtual is good for certain things and we will likely continue the new found energies online. However, I believe that we will see a change in how we do business and it may be that tradeshows take a different form than before. Many of us have noticed how the world could suddenly change. There was a point where some business functions could not be done from home offices – perhaps some of that was due to inertia or certain cultural norms that prevented a change in thinking from the old ways. But when Covid arrived it was suddenly possible. I don’t think we should completely return to how it was before, but we need to find a new balance. I call it 2020-Hindsight. In years to come we should look back at what good things we could take from the 2020 pandemic.

MB: Most definitely, the tradeshows will return, and I will be at the front of the queue to get in when they do. But there needs to be a good pinch of common sense when they do.
I think the tradeshows will be smaller and different in nature. Personally, of the three major tradeshows (NAB, Broadcast Asia and IBC) I think that IBC offers the most compelling visitor proposition. For many years, it has invested significantly in its conference, technology workshops and creative masterclass programme. Also, it has developed much more elegant exhibitor communications through the IBC Show Daily newspaper and IBC TV News channel.

However, every tradeshow will need to address the 400 kilo Gorilla in the room, which is what to do with virtual events. Without doubt, virtual communications have saved our bacon this year. In fact, my clients are finding that there are many positives to come from a well planned and implemented virtual campaign in the way it enables them to reach larger customer audiences, most of whom would have missed the ticket to attend the tradeshows in person.

I believe this is work in progress with all the tradeshows and I will be interested to see how they develop this element of their evolving business plans.

This is the perfect time for the industry to pause and take stock of trade shows. What, if any, changes would you like to see implemented for when shows return?

SR: Trade shows are an expensive exercise and they don’t always deliver fantastic ROI when it comes to new customer acquisition as a metric. They are an important part of our marketing efforts, for sure, and I’m not denying the value of the customer face-time, but there’s a lot of FOMO psychology at play when it comes to shows and our industry is way behind other industries I’ve worked in when it comes to digital marketing. I think the time is now right for a reset – shows organisers should refocus on their core offering and make that fit for purpose, recognising that we as marketing professionals have plenty of (highly measurable and cost-effective) alternative ways to spend our budgets. Shows are not competing against other shows for our money – they are competing with everything else in the marketing mix, and they need to smell that coffee and act or they risk becoming irrelevant. Give us a tight and targeted event with a good online package to go along with it, and don’t be greedy with the costs; that’s the winning recipe!

CD: I’d like to see tradeshow owners realise that they’re not only in the events business where real life physical events are the primary goal, they’re in the business of bringing together the buyers and sellers – and doing that can take many different forms. The organisers who are able to truly bring out the value of the “connections” they can make between buyer and seller are the ones that can win in the current challenging business world.

MB: It’s important to understand that this temporary pause has given us all an opportunity to make a root and branch review of their trade show participation. What has gone right? What could have gone better? Is the budget realistic? Can we better allocate our spend? How can we spend less – or more – to maximise our impact? How can we use what we have learned about maintaining and enhancing our visibility over the last six months to augment our more traditional approaches and generate new business? The number of parameters to consider is long, but each should be carefully considered.

I would like the conferences to be live streamed. I don’t personally believe that live streaming or on demand availability, for a nominal fee perhaps, would stop serious people from attending the event. Conversely, what it could do is draw people from vertical markets who could not justify the expense of attending. They would be able to plug into what the latest thinking is and share that with their constituents, which could drive business, spur additional interaction, and prompt in-person participation at subsequent events. You could consider it an investment in creating a broader reach for the sector.

I also see a hybrid of typical physical exhibitors coupled with a designated virtual zone emerging. We’re not going to just abandon virtual once the physical is again doable. There are those who argue that virtual would give people and excuse not to attend in person. But as I have alluded to previously, I disagree. If anything, it will help drive future attendance. There’s only so much you can achieve over the internet, as everyone who has been watching “interviews from home” can attest.

BC: I attended my first IBC in 1994 and since then I can count the number of major tradeshows that I have missed on the fingers of one hand. They are fantastic events – they are beacons of technical innovation and best professional practice that guide our industry forwards. However, for many years it has frustrated me that there is such an intense focus on these events over four or five days and then very little for the remainder of the year. As an industry, we are adept at harnessing new technologies as they evolve. Now, I think there is a massive opportunity for the big tradeshows to harness virtual communications.

If they can do this, they will extend the reach of these fantastic global events, both in terms of the size of the audience that benefits from the event and in the period of the year when exhibitors can engage meaningfully with this audience.

By Ben Pearce | TVBEurope | Published 10 September 2020

CBO Asia & CO-Founder GB Labs' Ben Pearce discusses why it's so important for content owners to choose their storage systems wisely with TVBEurope

I’ve been working with network area storage (NAS) for nearly 20 years and still see too many people buy what is clearly the wrong storage for what they need. Often, their decision is not based solely on perceived cost savings, it is usually a result of not fully understanding that the operative word is “shared” storage, meaning that the storage is about providing support for multiple files to multiple users. Looking at storage as a single purpose appliance has often proved to be short-sighted.

What I’m saying is that measuring peak performance and IOPS (input/output operations per second) as standalone criteria for purchasing a storage system is a mistake because those figures are often misleading. A single peak-performance figure provided by a manufacturer is not indicative of the totality of what a storage system can provide to a specific facility at which it is deployed. A high peak-performance figure may sound impressive, but doesn’t take into account multiple file access requirements that take place in a typical shared storage environment, so that figure is more applicable for DAS (directly accessed storage) systems. In short, IOPS are almost meaningless unless you know exactly what parameters were configured in the tests that were performed to arrive at that figure.

It’s too easy to arrive at misleading figures that promise false economies. The issue is that sales collateral that emphasises peak performance and IOPS figures are so prevalent that they distort the truth and lead, in many cases, to unhappy users when they subsequently find out that the claims on which they based their purchase decision bear little resemblance to real-world performance.

Back to basics

Hard drives come in many shapes and sizes, from many different manufacturers, and each manufacturer chooses what to adopt and promote from numerous storage model types and technologies.

What many end users don’t always grasp is that storage capacity alone is not a good measure of its ability to perform the tasks they need a storage system to do or to eliminate the bottlenecks they are buying it to fix.

It’s common for people to want, indeed expect, high, 24-hour duty cycle performance from a high-density RAID. But to achieve that, you need a very specific type of hard drive that comes at a higher cost than the consumer-grade drives that many assume will be “good enough”. And, like many things when you decide on a cheaper, “good enough” option, it soon costs even more to retroactively put right.

Thinking outside the capacity

There are many aspects other than capacity that impact storage system performance and reliability. For example, communal backplanes that address RAIDs inside NAS storage; the storage interface; and the number of paths and the quality of the host-based adapter (HBA) also play key roles. However, the benefits of getting these areas right are often overlooked in favour of focussing solely on greater capacity or lower cost. Again, too many people consider price-per-terabyte to be the sole purchasing parameter rather than taking a more holistic view that encompasses the entire spectrum of what a system can do when it’s designed, configured, and deployed to take advantage of a system’s entire range of capabilities.To get optimal performance, all of those aspects must work together.

Think of it this way: A race car that is installed with a very powerful engine, but with a too light chassis, standard gearbox and high street tyres to save money, is likely to spend more time in the garage than out of it, let alone ever be competitive in any races.

The best way around this somewhat short-sighted decision-making is to fully understand the potential ramifications of choosing the least-cost option. Ask detailed questions.

For example: Is the RAID level achieved in hardware or software? There are advantages and disadvantages to achieving the RAID level with either approach, so it’s important to find out which will work best for what you want to do. In some cases, it might be that a hybrid hardware and software-based RAID level system is the most appropriate option, but too many find this out after they’ve already installed a relatively cheap storage system that has little or no chance of delivering what they need. And all because they didn’t ask anything other than, “How much per terabyte?”

The OS is everything

I’ve been discussing questions to be asked and choices to be made concerning purchasing NAS, but I want to identify the main differentiator of any NAS, and that’s the operating system (OS) on which it runs.

No, I’m not talking about Windows or Mac. With NAS, the limitations of those operating systems are quickly reached and exceeded by NAS systems running on powerful hardware. Off-the-shelf operating systems are not suitable platforms for any professional shared storage system.

Nevertheless, the vast majority of NAS storage systems on the market today use generic, OTS operating systems that purport to turn hardware servers into functional NAS. The problem with that approach is that they must cater for a wide range of different hardware configurations from good to bad, which means that they are specifically tuned for none and even for those they can operate requires a great deal of compromise in many important areas.

Those faux NAS systems are “kind of” functional, but there are still major issues with them. For one, they’re unstable, and they also suffer from being designed to run on the lowest common denominator, which means that they are not computationally able to take full advantage of whatever hardware it may run on, no matter how good that hardware is. NAS hardware performance that looks good on printed specifications by the marketing department tends to fall short of real-world performance after it’s deployed. An additional problem with that is, having spent the money on a new NAS, the buyer just can’t understand why there’s been little or no improvement.

And after that money’s been spent, the boss is going to want to see those improvements, too. That’s why it’s vital to seek out hardware that can reach its full potential by working seamlessly with specially developed OS software that is highly tuned to achieve peak performance and functionality. Every component of a system must be perfectly matched and finely tuned. Hardware, software, OS…everything.

Testing is key

It amazes me that most storage system suppliers do not test their systems in high bandwidth editing and content creation environments with multiple workstations. It’s true. Most don’t.

And that’s a problem because it’s precisely those high-end editing and creation environments where many of these systems will be expected to perform. But it is too common for storage manufacturers to simply take the highest peak figure for bandwidth or IOPS that they can “in theory” achieve and publish that as their benchmark network storage and performance.

They then use that figure in the marketplace, claiming that you can just divide their figure by the number of workstations to calculate the performance that will be simultaneously delivered to each, which is patently absurd. Storage just doesn’t work like that.

I know I risk repeating myself, but it’s a fact worth reinforcing: Peak performance figures may look good on paper and sound compelling from a salesperson, but they usually only tell you about how that system is theorised to perform in a single scenario that probably hasn’t even been tested. What they don’t tell you is how a system will actually perform under the load of multiple machines, often around the clock, which is exactly what the real world requires.

And it’s critical to understand that differentiation. The very high bandwidths we’re talking about normally require at least a couple of workstations or servers to test and confirm performance figures, but most manufacturers use speed testing software that reads only one file at a time It also writes the same file, which is easily cached by the storage and therefore skews the results. This is why GB Labs always tests on real world edit suites with real media streams; not just to generate the highest figure we can get away with for marketing purposes, but to ensure the honesty and integrity of our performance figures.

Delivering ‘real world performance’ to a network

It’s important to understand that powerful storage in a server room can equate to powerful network performance. Yes, eliminating bottlenecks by utilising the latest network protocols, connectivity, and distribution methods is important, but that’s not something most NAS systems enable you to do.

There are, however, a few exceptions. What a good NAS will do is control the delivery of data by automatically making intelligent decisions on who gets allocated what portion of the overall bandwidth. Sophisticated controls like this are rare, but they are increasingly necessary to ensure Quality of Service (QoS) to the many users on the network.

Moreover, finding a system with the ability to dynamically adapt to usage and deliver 100 percent of the available bandwidth narrows the field of potential NAS solutions even further.

Therefore, choose wisely

All of the above are just some of the reasons to take time to carefully analyse the storage system investment you are about to make. The acronym ‘NAS’ is a broad term that is rather too loosely used to cover many different grades of technology offerings in the market, many of which, in truth, have little or nothing to do with true NAS. As I’ve said, limiting your research to how much it will cost per TB is short-sighted and will end in disappointment, not to mention wasted time and money.

So research your NAS options to determine all of what you need to deliver for your business, not just in terms of capacity to store additional assets, but how that storage can streamline your business whilst simultaneously providing the best and most efficient experience for multiple users, both now and in the future.

Most of all, make doubly sure that each and every component is highly tuned to the others. It’s the only way to get what you paid for.

Full article available here

 

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